Ceilings for Every Home and Every Architectural Style

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Traditionally overlooked as just a way of concealing wires and pipes, ceilings are now enjoying their rightful place in the spotlights. Just as the flooring sets the design and color scheme of a room, the ceiling plays an integral part in any interior decoration project. And more and more homeowners have come to realize their importance in the overall look of a room.

The ceiling is designed to not only compliment the rest of the room but also to make a statement. If not properly planned, you can be left with small rooms that feel claustrophobic. Certainly, no one wants that! Hence, when designing your dream house, consider the style you are going for and your budget before building or renovating. Once you have a clear picture of what you want, start looking at the different types of ceilings, what they look like, their advantages and their disadvantages. Also, search for the best ceiling contractors in your area and the services they provide.

We’ve rounded up a list of ceilings that can look good with any types of home:

1. Acoustic ceiling

Acoustic ceilings are made with ceiling tiles that can block, absorb, and diffuse sound. Engineered from a variety of materials and features, acoustic ceilings are optimized to be used inside enclosed rooms or in open spaces.

Also called soundproofing, noise-canceling, sound isolation, noise reduction solutions, and noise blocking, high-performing, sound-absorbing ceiling tiles provide effective noise control.  These ceilings can be adapted so it is also visually appealing.

2. Vaulted ceiling

An umbrella term for any elevated ceiling, the vaulted ceiling can make any room look bigger than it really is by creating an airy feel in the space.

While more difficult to maintain than conventional ceilings and less likely to create a cozy intimate feeling due to its heights, a vaulted ceiling can add oomph to the design of a room.

3. Suspended ceilings (also called dropped ceilings or false ceilings)

Most commonly used in offices, suspended ceilings can also look good in houses. Since suspended ceilings are suspended from the real ceiling above, they create a void between the underside of the slab above and the top of the suspended ceiling.

Suspended ceilings are not only useful for hiding unsightly wires, but also for the distribution of heating and air conditioning.

4. Exposed ceilings

As the industrial look becomes more popular, an exposed ceiling can add a stylish visual aesthetic to your house. It does the opposite of what a suspended ceiling will do.

Instead of concealing, it puts the air ducts, beams, trusses, wires and piping on display. It definitely lends a more industrial or modern look to a space.

5. Cathedral ceilings

Cathedral ceilings, as is obvious, gets its name from the fact that is was widely used in cathedrals. But despite its name, cathedral ceilings are widely used in residential homes.

Unlike vaulted ceilings, cathedral ceilings are symmetrical and conform to the shape of the roof. These added elements lend a wonderful sense of comfort, familiarity and added space to any room.

6. Tin ceilings

Originating in the 1880s, tin ceilings offers can offer a vintage touch to a house. With today’s technology, tin ceiling panels come in an array of hues and can, therefore, match almost any style, including traditionally styled houses.

After all, the luster and shine of steel, copper, and brass can undisputedly add a certain flair to just about any space.

7. Cove ceilings

Although cove ceilings have experienced a decline in popularity since the last century, incorporating sculpted ceilings with modern-day designs has led to cove ceilings making a comeback.

What with a wired ceiling, different textures, a wide range of patterns and paints, designing cove ceilings can be tricky. But because of its versatility, you can do a variety of things, such as a seamless design or an accented one.

8. Tray ceilings

Tray ceilings, not to be confused with cove ceilings, look like an inverted tray. By creating an open style, they can be used in small rooms by opening them up.

Although used exclusively in bedrooms and dining rooms, tray ceilings have gained popularity in the kitchen as well. The design can be of any shape, can be completely vertical or angled and can combine several concentric sections.

9. Plasterboard ceilings

Plasterboard ceilings, also called drywall, can be fixed on an existing ceiling. The most prominent advantage of this ceiling is that it can be an easy Do-It-Yourself project that can save you a fortune.

Good for reducing noise transmission, it can also be used to give your house a quick update. Nowadays, the manufacturing of plasterboards involves adding antifungal agents to help the ceiling resist mold growth and last longer.

10. Coffered ceilings

While a tray ceiling has only one recessed section, a coffered ceiling can have several. Taking the same approach as a beamed ceiling, coffered ceilings can lend a bit of elegance and sophistication to just about any room.

They can also add height and depth to any space in your house.

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